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Artists at Work at Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center
Nov 9th 2015 Posted in: Blog, Exhibitions 0
Sol LeWitt (U.S.A., 1928–2007 Bands of Lines in Four Directions–B, 1993. Woodcut. Gift of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York; Hassam, Speicher, Betts and Symons Funds 1995, 1995.14

Sol LeWitt (U.S.A., 1928 – 2007) Bands of Lines in Four Directions–B, 1993. Woodcut. Gift of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York; Hassam, Speicher, Betts and Symons Funds 1995, 1995.14.

The Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University presents Artists at Work, through January 18, 2016.

Artists at Work is a major exhibition at Stanford University’s Cantor Arts Center that examines how artists become inspired, how they make objects, and how place can impact an artist’s work.

The exhibition features more than 70 works from the museum’s permanent collection, including works by Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Édouard Manet, J. M. W. Turner, Sol LeWitt, Richard Serra, and other renowned American and European artists. There are also several pieces on loan from contemporary artists Trevor Paglen, Garth Weiser, Rachel Owens, and others.

Artists at Work deeply fuses the lessons of art history with the act of making art. The exhibition begins with the theme of artistic process—how artists work, how do they learn, and how have these ideas changed over time. The show further seeks to discover where artists draw inspiration from, be it personal or professional relationships, or elsewhere, and the effect that place has on artistic practice. Visitors have the opportunity to learn by looking at significant historical pieces hanging side-by-side with some of the most important contemporary work.

Tina Modotti (Mexico, 1896–1942), Edward Weston in Mexico, c. 1923. Gelatin silver print. Museum Purchase Fund, 1973.58

Tina Modotti (Mexico, 1896–1942), Edward Weston in Mexico, c. 1923. Gelatin silver print. Museum Purchase Fund, 1973.58.

The museum’s recent acquisitions of renowned Bay Area artist Richard Diebenkorn’s sketchbooks and early 20th-century painter Edward Hopper’s painting New York Corner—both of which are on concurrent view at the museum through February 8—in large part inspired the exhibition.

“Examining the pages of the Diebenkorn sketchbooks offers deep and revelatory insights into Diebenkorn’s practice. One begins to consider biggest-picture artistic questions, like why Diebenkorn made art, how he made it and where he made it. The sketchbooks really prompted us to look at our collection and compare other artists’ creative processes to Diebenkorn’s. And that thinking became the impetus for Artists at Work,” said Alison Gass, the Cantor’s associate director for exhibitions, collections and curatorial affairs.

Artists at Work is on display now through January 18, 2016.

Visit the Cantor Arts Center website for more information.

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