Featured Posts
Oct 3rd 2017 Posted in: Blog, Featured Posts, Interviews 0

anton-belov-Body Politic

You may have noticed a new face at The Flow over the past several months. Meet Anton Belov: His official title is Production Assistant, and in his time here, he’s proven to be a valuable member of our small team.

A recent graduate of California College of the Arts with a BFA in Illustration and a freelance graphic designer, Anton Belov has been doing a little bit of everything at The Image Flow, from printing photographs to designing fliers to being available for the next task, whatever it might be. When he is not at The Flow, he can be found freelancing for a number of clients such as Stanford Children’s Health, Saint Mary’s College of California, or the Paramount.

“Recently I’ve been gravitating toward illustration, moving away from graphic design and becoming more interested in the image-making part design, rather than shapes and text,” he said.

Sep 19th 2017 Posted in: Featured Posts, Travel, Workshops 0

photography workshop italy umbria

Jeff Zaruba and I arrived in Umbria a few days before the workshop began to scout locations with our Italian assistant Lorenzo. Those first couple of days were busy, but they were nothing compared to the non-stop action once the workshop began.

We had 10 students in the group and one of the students brought along his wife. On our first day of shooting, we went to a bed and breakfast we’d scouted a year ago. The location is extremely picturesque and Eleanora was all ready for us: The kitchen was set up for us to shoot while she prepared lunch, and she’d planned a wonderful menu.

May 2nd 2017 Posted in: Featured Posts, Photographers 1

Fran Meckler Papua New Guinea documentary photography

Photographer Fran Meckler is passionate about her social documentary work—she’s visited more than 70 countries over her career. Her latest images were made during a two-week trip to Papua New Guinea where she documented in vivid color the changing landscape, the lives of many different tribes and what is still left of tribal life in the 21st century, and the mystery of that very foreign culture.

In a new exhibition at the World Affairs Council in San Francisco, Fran will show 25 images from the trip, printed by The Image Flow.

Feb 13th 2017 Posted in: Featured Posts, Photographers, Workshops 0

photographing auto racing dennis gray DSC_6133

Dennis Gray was introduced to photography right about the same time his father started sneaking him into the Stockton sport races in the trunk of his car—he was 14. “I got a Nikon F, one of the first ones they made in 1959, and at the same time, my father bought a go-kart that he and I raced. We were both gear heads,” recalled Dennis. “He snuck me into the races so he didn’t have to pay the $2 entry fee.”

Jan 4th 2017 Posted in: Featured Posts, Interviews 2

Preserving vintage maps Abraham Ortelius's Maris Pacifici

Michael Jennings and Cecilia Malaguti are the couple behind Neatline Maps, a vintage and rare map dealer in the San Francisco Bay Area. They came to The Image Flow to make a digital archive of their collection—which consists currently of over 300 maps—both for their online store, and as a way to preserve the maps and the stories they represent. The reproductions are being made with TIF’s medium format Hasselblad, which offers extreme resolution and sharpness.

Michael and Cecelia became interested in maps through their training as archaeologists—Michael works for the nonprofit Center for Digital Archaeology in Marin. They started out collecting a few maps they particularly enjoyed, but a year ago, they decided to turn their hobby into a business.

Nov 29th 2016 Posted in: Featured Posts 0

Nikon Lens Mug

Need gift ideas for the photographer in your life? Check out these handpicked gifts for the discerning photographer this holiday season.

The Image Flow has curated our list of the very best gifts for photographers. Every one of these great gifts is sure to excite and inspire professionals, advanced amateurs, and would-bes alike!

Oct 18th 2016 Posted in: Blog, Featured Posts, Travel 3

slow food umbria assisi

Stuart Schwartz recently spent three days with his family in Umbria, Italy, as part of a scouting trip for a new workshop next summer focused on the Slow Food movement and the local Italian lifestyle.

“My goal is to create a workshop in which we’ll create an accurate portrait of Umbria—the people, lifestyle, landscape, and architecture—but also get an intimate experience of what it’s like to actually live in Umbria, if even for only a short time,” writes Stuart.

Sep 26th 2016 Posted in: Exhibitions, Featured Posts 0

Two Businessmen, SF, Ca, 1971 Gelatin silver print, 7 ¾ "× 11 ½ ", Matte 16"× 20"

Photographer and collage artist Ken Graves is best known for his black-and-white street photography of San Francisco at the transition from the 1960s to the 1970s. Graves passed away earlier this year at the age of 74, leaving behind a legacy of more than 50 years of work. Almost two dozen pieces are part of SFMOMA’s permanent collection, and now the Anglim Gilbert Gallery in San Francisco has put together a new exhibition, The Home Front, to pay tribute to this great California artist.

Aug 27th 2016 Posted in: Exhibitions, Featured Posts, Photographers 0

Star Tracks Over Yosemite Falls Starlight night photography

Don Whitebread owns a decent telescope but admits he’s not much of an astronomer. He bought the telescope to do astrophotography, and then realized it didn’t give him the opportunity to play with time in the way he’d imagined.

“The work I’m doing, I feel like I’m capturing a particular moment. It’s a long moment, but still, it’s a moment in time when these stars happen to line up with this foreground and it creates a composition,” he said.

The work he’s referring to is part of an ongoing collection called Starlight. He shoots mostly with a medium-format Hasselblad and black and white film—digital cameras don’t allow for the type of exposure he’s after. Each exposure requires an exposure of around an hour and a half. The result is a glimpse of thousands of stars moving across the night sky.

Aug 23rd 2016 Posted in: Featured Posts, Kids Workshops 0

kids photography workshops

It’s been a busy summer at The Image Flow with two sessions of our Summer Photo Camp for Kids and the Angel Island Summer Photo Excursion. All of these kids photography workshops are geared toward middle school-aged shooters, one of my favorite ages to teach because they’re able to handle more challenging concepts and assignments and they learn so fast.

The goals of the workshops are simple: Teach kids how to use their camera on manual mode and how to do basic post-processing in Lightroom—I find that even my intermediate students benefit from the review and practice of using their cameras with the exercises I give them. In the Angel Island workshop, which is made up primarily of students that already have some photography experience, we do some work with Photoshop as well.

Jul 26th 2016 Posted in: Featured Posts, Photographers, Student Work 1

Mystical Cloud Cover Tennessee Valley

Liz Caroli is a recently retired teacher with a newfound passion for photography, but looking at her photographs, you might think she’s been shooting for a very long time. However, she bought her first “real camera” barely three years ago. She credits her rapidly improving skills behind the camera to hard work and the excellent teaching skills of the instructors at The Image Flow.

Her first initial impetus to pursue photography came during a trip to Belize. On a side trip to Half Moon Caye National Monument, Liz snapped a few shots of a flock of birds flying overhead.

Jun 28th 2016 Posted in: Featured Posts, Tips & Techniques 4

photographer portfolio print presentation

As a commercial photographer, workshop instructor, and owner of The Image Flow, Stuart Schwartz is no stranger to the portfolio review—and he’s sat on both sides of the table. Here he offers his tips for building your portfolio for success. First and foremost, there is nothing more impressive than a printed portfolio.

Periodic portfolio reviews are an essential part of any serious photographer’s game plan. They’re a great opportunity to get your work literally under the noses of the right people. But before you submit your work to a professional portfolio review, you’ll want to be sure your portfolio is in the best shape possible.

How does one begin creating a successful artist’s portfolio? The information I will share with you here will be useful to anyone working in fine art or commercial photography, illustration, or art, and who would like to present their work in a professional manner to potential clients, friends, and colleagues.

To be successful, an artist must have a vision, must master the technical skills required in their chosen medium, and have a basic understanding of the art business.

Apr 26th 2016 Posted in: Exhibitions, Featured Posts, Interviews 1

Big Red, Jay Ruland, Withering Roses, exploration of age and age issues, pictures of flowers, flower photography

After 25 years in the workforce, Jay Ruland decided to go back to school and, not surprisingly, found himself surrounded by 20-somethings. While he says he was welcomed by his junior contemporaries, he was struck by the way they perceive the world; that is, the things they found to be beautiful also tended to be as young as they were. As a 50-something, Jay says the aging process is beautiful in itself, and the desire to show that is the basis for his Withering Roses floral photography series, which will be featured in his new solo exhibition at The Image Flow As the Allure Fades opening on May 14.

“The younger students sort of had a bias toward things in society that are young and pretty, and we’re taught through the media that younger is better. But if you look closer in nature, things that are getting older are still beautiful and the process itself is a beautiful process,” says Jay.

He chose to work with roses because they are a societal symbol for beauty, something you’d give on a first date or use to decorate your house, but also because they can communicate ideas, from the number you give to the color, and transgress cultural barriers.

Apr 19th 2016 Posted in: Featured Posts, Photographers 0

Fine-art photographers. Self-Portrait in Octopus, 2009. Photo © David Favrod.

It is no secret that the medium of photography has become increasingly complicated by the advent of the digital age. Nearly every image we encounter—from advertising and billboards to packaging and fine art—receives some level of digital treatment before arriving in our periphery. Altered images have become so commonplace that they are no longer questioned.

Knowing this, why then is there a persisting notion of photography as a mechanism of truth? It seems to exist as a residual concept of the photograph as something objective and substantiated by its relationship to reality.

But what we perceive to be real is malleable and shifting. This is where my personal interests in photography seem to manifest, in a space where artists are free to toy with the artifice that is inherent to photographs. Through individual choices regarding process, presentation, and content, the following are a few contemporary photographic artists that tread the boundaries of illusion and reality.

Apr 7th 2016 Posted in: Featured Posts, Photographers, Tips & Techniques 0

Tips for night photography from expert shooter Hendrik Paul

Fine art photographer Hendrik Paul is best known for his surreal black and white landscapes of the Marin Headlands, but he also likes to venture out at night to take ethereal images in both urban and rural settings.

Here our most accomplished night shooter shares his tips for night photography, from the best equipment to use to the best time to shoot, so you can start taking beautiful photos at night!

Mar 28th 2016 Posted in: Featured Posts, Kids Workshops, Tips & Techniques 0

How to be a better photographer

Our favorite kids instructor Constance Chu gives us four tips for young photographers (and you too) on how to be better at photography. She says, getting good at photography is just like anything else: To be good, you’ve got to work at it.

While she won’t guarantee you fame and fortune in photography, she says becoming a better photographer is not as daunting a task as it may sometimes seem—and it will also be a lot of fun!

Mar 8th 2016 Posted in: Featured Posts, Travel, Workshops 0

Photography in Cuba, photographing Cuba

The Image Flow is back from our second (perhaps annual) workshops in Cuba. There were new experiences, old friends, and of course a night at the Tropicana. The group came home exhilarated and stimulated and with a portfolio of work even beyond our own expectations. Stuart Schwartz fills us in.

We wanted to build on the success of our first photography workshop in Cuba in April 2015, and this past February organized two more back to back, Cuba: Behind Closed Doors and The Havana Highway: Rum, Cars & Cigars. It was particularly satisfying to us as organizers that all six participants from last April signed up again, and we added to that some great new faces, including two old friends of mine who joined us all the way from Switzerland.

Both sessions turned out to be just ideal, from student participation to the variety of shooting opportunities. Of course there were glitches, as there will be when organizing a group of people—especially in Cuba—but it’s a testament to both our local guides Ramses and Alex and the go-with-the-flow attitude of the group that no matter what came up, we made the best of it. Ramses Batista, a renowned photographer in his own right, was our man on the ground; he’d make a call, and all of a sudden we were in a private apartment shooting portraits of a fascinating individual. Often, those little glitches served to make our experience even more authentic and unique.

Feb 9th 2016 Posted in: Featured Posts, Interviews 0

Chrysta Giffen photo retouching digital imaging expert

If you read magazines or watch TV (or have landed at SFO recently) you’ve seen Chrysta Giffen’s work. With more than 12 years in the photography industry, she’s one of the most sought-after digital retouchers in the business. Her extensive client list includes Nike, Disney, and Sephora; Bravo TV, Discovery Channel, and Showtime; New York Magazine, Wired, and Men’s Vogue; and a certain giant albino python—just to name a few.

Jan 25th 2016 Posted in: Featured Posts, Interviews, Selected Artists 0

A film still from Gary Yost's work in Fiji. Gary says Fijians and warm and welcoming people.

Marin County, CA-based filmmaker Gary Yost is best known for his short film The Invisible Peak about a project to restore the West Peak of Mount Tamalpais to its natural state. The film was shown in numerous film festivals to acclaim and awards. Most recently, Gary was invited to the Fijian island of Vanua Levu by Gavin de Becker, founder of the Naqaqa Giving Foundation to film the indigenous people of that island.

Jan 13th 2016 Posted in: Featured Posts, Photographers, Tips & Techniques 0

Burnt palms near Salton Sea, 2015. Photo © Ted Orland.

Ted Orland is one of The Image Flow’s favorite wandering photographers, with a love of photography and life that is truly infectious.

He began his career as a young graphic artist working for famed designer Charles Eames and later served as photographer Ansel Adams’s assistant. Now a celebrated landscape photographer himself, Ted’s portfolio spans classical black and white photography, hand-colored photographs, and one-of-a-kind multi-image panoramas. He also co-authored the best-selling artists’ survival guide book Art & Fear: Observations on the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking.

This spring, Ted will lead a new landscape and travel photography workshop to California’s Salton Sea and Joshua Tree National Park along with Brian Taylor, artistic director of the Center for Photographic Art.

In his own words, Ted shares seven of his favorite photography subjects throughout in this unique region of California.